Now everybody’s a gin distiller

Adnams plans to give more of its customers the chance to make their own gin in-store as it embarks on a retail expansion programme.

The service is already available at its branch in Bury St Edmunds, Suffolk, which is fitted with seven mini stills. Customers pay £95 to distil their own spirit and add a choice of botanicals in a process that takes two and a half hours and results in a bespoke bottle of gin.

Retail chief Neil Griffin says people are given gin and tonics to enjoy while they wait. He adds: “We’re quite keen on this customisation and personalisation trend that’s coming through.The Wine Merchant issue 63

“We give people a selection of botanicals and talk them through what each one of them potentially does. They put four or five of them into the pot still and distil it down, and you get the liquid at the end. We label it up with the name of your choice.

“It’s going really well. Customers are enjoying the experience and it’s climbing the Trip Advisor rankings in East Anglia.”

The concept is likely to be rolled out to future Adnams Cellar & Kitchen branches that are currently being scouted, though not in the pop-up that has just opened in the centre of Cambridge and will trade until the New Year.

Adnams spokesman Josh Wicks says Cambridge is a city that the company is “obviously keen to get into”. He adds: “The pop-up gives us flexibility and a bit of a foothold, and then we’ll look for something more permanent.

“It’s a busy and competitive place, but you don’t want to shy away from those places – you want to be in there.”

This article appears in the October edition of The Wine Merchant.

Advertisements

The late, late show

Late payments and bad debts are the bane of any business person’s life. They are the reasons why many independent retailers are reluctant to wholesale. But some suppliers say they are having exactly these problems with independent wine merchants.

The Wine Merchant issue 62

Why should that be the case? There are various theories. One is that indies are feeling the pinch in an uncertain economic climate. Another is that, as merchants tie up increasing amounts of cash in direct imports, they are finding it harder to pay their UK suppliers on time.

It’s a thorny issue and one we look at in depth in the September edition of The Wine Merchant.

Not just selling drinks but making them too

The Wine Merchant issue 61
There’s a lot of chatter these days about independents importing direct (yes, we’re responsible for some of that). But what’s less reported is the decision of a small but growing number of indies to sell their own exclusive brands.

The August edition of The Wine Merchant focuses on three merchants who have gone this route, in their own way.

There’s Aimee Davies, of Aimee’s Wine House in Bristol, who has installed a microbrewery in one of her two shops. Sounds expensive and fiddly, but the kit is paying for itself and Aimee reports that brewing beer is nothing like as complicated as she’d been led to believe.

We also talk to Toby Peirce of Quaff, with stores in Brighton and Hove. He’s just launched an exclusive beer brand called Lost Pier, which creates a nice point of difference in store and may also boost his local wholesale business.

Finally, we hear from Archie McDiarmid at Luvians in St Andrews, whose team have been working with local distillers on bespoke whisky and gin projects. Beer is the next project on the horizon.

He describes the activity as “a natural next step” for the business. There will be plenty of independents who feel the same.

Crowd funding could unlock independents’ potential

Crowd funding is a useful way for small businesses to raise a bit of extra cash. In the wine trade the money might be channeled into a new sampling device, or perhaps a second branch. Those who make donations get a nice thank-you and an invitation to the launch party, but often not much more.

Taurus Wines in Surrey has gone a step further, raising £275,000 via Crowdcube to finance a move to larger premises and to open a second branch. The benefactors in this case have become shareholders in the business, with a combined stake of 10%. In time they will probably receive an annual dividend of 6% and even be able to trade their shares.

It’s an interesting business model and one that could work for dozens of independents who are looking at expansion plans. Read all about the Taurus experience in the July edition of The Wine Merchant.

‘Sommeliers are the rock gods, independent merchants merely session musicians’

Our regular columnist Adeline Mangevine is tired of being put in her place …

It’s a quiet Monday afternoon and I’m “catching up” on Instagram. As I scroll through picture after picture of unicorn wines consumed over the weekend by people I don’t know, something grabs my eye. It’s a post by one of my suppliers of a group of four fresh-faced sommeliers from Michelin-starred joints standing in a vineyard on Santorini. “Awesome start to the trip!!” says the caption. “Time to taste some Assyrtiko!!!”

I am more than a little annoyed – and not just by the overuse of the exclamation mark.

I probably shift more of this producer’s Assyrtiko in a week than do all four somms combined in a month. I’ve championed it and built up a loyal following. Yet I have never been invited to visit the place where it is created. Why? Because independent wine merchants are not rock stars. We’re the uncredited session musicians. We don’t get showered in glory when we commit to buy six bottles of an obscure, skin-contact Spanish mountain wine that will impress other members of the wine trade (but will move slower than a snail wearing lead weights). We don’t get hard-to-come-by wines reserved for us (unpaid) for months on end. A suburban shop is just not as sexy as saying your wine is listed by hot new London joint The Bathing Pool or super-cool country retreat Doghouse Manor.

Yet collectively, we independent wine merchants are worth hundreds of millions. We are the alternative to supplier-squeezing multiples; we’ll take risks on unknown grapes, wines and regions; we are the people who convince consumers week in, week out to part with their hard-earned cash on a white that isn’t a Sauvignon Blanc and a red that is more than £10. But often, it feels like we’re the office juniors of the industry.

If somms are the rock gods, then wine writers are the movie stars. They’re always complaining about how few parts are available to them (for parts, read column inches) – but then act as if the nation stops in its tracks to read what they write.

Suppliers and producers swoon like fans when a well-known writer glides to their table at a tasting in the hope that these critics might write a glowing sentence about one of their wines. They’ll drop everything, including any merchant who might be tasting their wares. Instantly, we are reduced to being unpaid extras, holding empty glasses aloft.

I will be kinder to wine writers who are also MWs – and MWs in general. Same goes for Master Sommeliers. They’ve had to pass all those big, nasty exams to get to a level of expertise. I am happy to play house doctor to their consultant surgeon.

As for the buyers from the multiples and behemoth distributors, I see them as government ministers. Lots of attention is paid to what they say and do, much of it irrelevant to a major part of the industry: independent wine merchants.

This article appears in the June edition of The Wine Merchant.