Independent numbers continue to grow

The Wine Merchant issue 65The number of specialist independent wine merchants in the UK has hit a new high.

There are now 855 shops operated by 624 businesses, according to the latest data compiled by The Wine Merchant, a net increase of 31 premises on the figure recorded in January 2017.

That figure is below the net growth of 40 shops seen in 2016, but encouraging news for an industry which is feeling the effects of the weaker pound and faltering confidence in much of the retail sector.

Twenty-three new wine merchants appeared last year, with the rest of the growth accounted for by existing businesses opening new branches. There were a number of closures, but these were easily outnumbered by the number of openings – and for once several indies were sold as going concerns.

Although last year’s Wine Merchant reader survey found that just 28% of independents sell wine for consumption on the premises, 13 of the 23 new entrants have some form of on-premise offer, which may offer clues about the future direction of the trade generally.

Just over half of the new shops – 16 – appeared in London, while three were opened in Wales.

Analysis in the January edition of The Wine Merchant.

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Five Coravins to be won in our annual survey

The Wine Merchant annual reader survey is the most important study of the independent wine trade in the UK.

The responses that we get help us put together a detailed picture of how independents are faring, and how the trade as a whole is approaching the year ahead. It allows us to monitor trends, take stock of the relationship with suppliers, and keep tabs on the way retailers are adapting their businesses.

Once again our partners are Hatch Mansfield and they have kindly donated five Coravins which will be presented to five participants selected at random.

If you’d prefer to stay anonymous, that’s fine. All we insist on is that participants are UK independent merchants with at least one bricks-and-mortar sales premises.

Thanks as always for your support.

Take the survey

Twelve unsettling wine commercials

You don’t see many TV ads for wine these days, and these examples may partly explain why.

Premier Estates Taste the Bush (2015)
An ad so bad it got banned. Whether that was deserved more for its feeble humour or the general inappropriateness is a moot point. We detect the paw-prints here of a couple of male 20-year-old interns whose brains short-circuited when they made the bush/pubic hair connection. Chortle!

Orson Welles likes Paul Masson California Champagne (Outtake)
Never work with children, animals or ageing film icons. It appears that a lubricated Orson Welles has been unwittingly parachuted onto the set of Abigail’s Party. He emits a fabulous Shakespearian wail, Brian Blessed-style, before scratching his nose and falling asleep. Cut. Take 21.

Bolla Valpolicella (1978)
Straight from the Mills & Boon school of wine commercials. When a lone “soft” woman is drinking wine made for “people who are in love” and catches the eye of a “full-bodied” moustachioed man who is also drinking wine made for “people who are in love”, it’s obvious: they fall in love. Who needs Tinder?

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Now everybody’s a gin distiller

Adnams plans to give more of its customers the chance to make their own gin in-store as it embarks on a retail expansion programme.

The service is already available at its branch in Bury St Edmunds, Suffolk, which is fitted with seven mini stills. Customers pay £95 to distil their own spirit and add a choice of botanicals in a process that takes two and a half hours and results in a bespoke bottle of gin.

Retail chief Neil Griffin says people are given gin and tonics to enjoy while they wait. He adds: “We’re quite keen on this customisation and personalisation trend that’s coming through.The Wine Merchant issue 63

“We give people a selection of botanicals and talk them through what each one of them potentially does. They put four or five of them into the pot still and distil it down, and you get the liquid at the end. We label it up with the name of your choice.

“It’s going really well. Customers are enjoying the experience and it’s climbing the Trip Advisor rankings in East Anglia.”

The concept is likely to be rolled out to future Adnams Cellar & Kitchen branches that are currently being scouted, though not in the pop-up that has just opened in the centre of Cambridge and will trade until the New Year.

Adnams spokesman Josh Wicks says Cambridge is a city that the company is “obviously keen to get into”. He adds: “The pop-up gives us flexibility and a bit of a foothold, and then we’ll look for something more permanent.

“It’s a busy and competitive place, but you don’t want to shy away from those places – you want to be in there.”

This article appears in the October edition of The Wine Merchant.

The late, late show

Late payments and bad debts are the bane of any business person’s life. They are the reasons why many independent retailers are reluctant to wholesale. But some suppliers say they are having exactly these problems with independent wine merchants.

The Wine Merchant issue 62

Why should that be the case? There are various theories. One is that indies are feeling the pinch in an uncertain economic climate. Another is that, as merchants tie up increasing amounts of cash in direct imports, they are finding it harder to pay their UK suppliers on time.

It’s a thorny issue and one we look at in depth in the September edition of The Wine Merchant.